Friday, August 23, 2019

Computers Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Computers - Essay Example Seeking to explore Dell Computers in holistic analysis, the following will provide a synopsis of the research undertaken on Dell Computers with an eye to the applicability and functuionalisty of this brand of PC. Perusing the site of Dell Computers and looking at the major price points, I determined that the Dell Vostro 220 was the cheapest option of available while the Dell Precision T7500 was the most expensive model on the market. What are the storage requirements for basic application such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop or Netscape Navigator? Microsoft Office requires a computer and processor of 500 megahertz (MHz) processor or higher; memory which is 256 megabyte (MB) RAM or higher1 and a hard disk space of 1.5 gigabyte (GB). Adobe Photoshop requires a processor which is 1.8GHz or faster, a minimum of 512MB of RAM (1GB recommended) and at least 1GB of available hard-disk space for installation. Finally, Netscape Navigator is no longer on the market, therefore its requirements are irrelevant. The following statement was released by parent company AOL, â€Å"Given AOLs current business focus and the success the Mozilla Foundation has had in developing critically-acclaimed products, we feel its the right time to end development of Netscape branded software. Read the history page for more details about this decision.† (Microsoft, 2009; Adobe 2009; Netscape, 2009). Looking at both the cheapest as well as the most expensive Dell models presently on the market, it is evident that both the Dell Vostro 220 and the high-end Dell Precision T7500 can support basic software applications such as the Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop. When you buy a new software package, why does it state the minimum RAM and hard drive space your computer must have for you to run this program? Essentially this sort of information pertains to the amount of available space

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Contractors in the Military Essay Example for Free

Contractors in the Military Essay Going back in time to the Civil War, private contractors can be found, providing support, logistics, and supplies to the military forces. If you think about today’s military bases and approaching the front gate that do you see? Well the first person you see is a private security guard standing there waiting to welcome you to fort whatever. Why don’t you see a Military Police Officer standing there? Simple question right, well it isn’t because the Military is going more and more towards a civilian work force. What does going to basically civilian work force do for those men and women that serve in the United States Military today? Is the government really making the right choice by continuing to use private contractors back home and abroad in war zones today? That is where this paper is going to search out the causes and effects of the use of private contractors or civilian work force in today’s Military. Today’s Military bases are flooded with civilian workforce working for the government as private contractors. The Government today is looking for anyway to cut Military budget and save money. But is using the civilian workforce saving money? Well let’s talk about those security guards at the front gate, let’s say the guard is between a GS 1-3 the average salary for them are seventeen thousand to twenty eight thousand a year. Now look at an Army Military Police Officer e-1 through e-3 which is equivalent to the GS 1-3 the salary for that e-1 through e-3 is between seventeen thousand to twenty thousand dollars a year. So from that little comparison using a private workforce really isn’t saving anyone any money. Let me remind you that doesn’t include years in service. Because more time in the GS ranks you make more money faster. But for that enlisted soldier his money caps after so many years. But everywhere you go you see more and more civilian workforce so there must be a positive side to having civilians work alongside with the Military agencies. Having private contractors work alongside with the Military can take some stress off of units that are deployed down range in combat zones. Those units can focus on their missions at hand and can rely on logistical support and personnel support from basically private security forces downrange. â€Å"For the State Department, armed contractors likewise perform a variety of security tasks†(Isenberg 2009). In comparison to past conflicts the United States was involved in like Gulf War one in which the ratio was one contractor to fifty eight service men. Now let’s jump to the Bosnia conflict where the ration jumped to one to fifth teen. Then you look at Iraq War which the ratio dropped to one to six. So the use of the contractor is becoming more evident in armed conflict zones. So many jobs that the Military gives to the private sector are specific jobs or a â€Å"valuable skill† that is a specific task. So by giving those specific jobs to contractors in war zones al lows the military to provide sustainment abilities on forward bases. â€Å"Then you have to look at the bad side of those private contractors, with the likes of Black Water, and Triple Canopy†(Cotton 2010). Those two companies have been involved in many altercations that put a bad taste in people’s mouth about private companies working in war zones. Each company did many things that caused a lot of crisis for fellow service members while they were deployed in hostile places. These companies go to do a job get paid more by our United States Government then goes and does hostile acts against the other country, that puts many other people not just service members in harm way. So why should the DOD pay people like this? Well that is just the great debate. So with the government in war still in Afghanistan, why do we continue to rely on so many private companies, well that is because of those vital assets those people offer. So if the government would put a little more faith in the Military Services we have and train. We could start working on the costs of what is spent while we are at war. Even though it would be great to limit the use of contractors, the use of the contractors just needs to be limited in certain ways. Keep using the ones that are needed to assist in logistical support and aid in missions to assist. Try and stop the use of the ones in war zones running missions could improve on the government spending, let those people that serve in the Military keep running those missions, because that is what enlisted do serve our country. Works Cited ISENBERG, DAVID. Shadow Force. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2009. Praeger Security International Online. 1 Jan 2013.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Political Recruitment Procedure in Nigeria

Political Recruitment Procedure in Nigeria THE RELEVANCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION TO POLITICAL RECRUITMENT IN NIGERIA BY Franklins A. SANUBI, PhD Department of Political Science, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria KEYWORDS: Entrepreneurship Education, Political Recruitment, Entrepreneurship, Intrapreneuring. ABSTRACT: The continuing influx of non professionals into party politics in Nigeria has created the challenges of good governance and many hove asked the question of how to rid the political space of neophytes. One explanation for this phenomenon is provided in the prevailing political recruitment procedure in Nigeria. Entrepreneurship education has provided some philosophical tool for establishing a reliable political recruitment process. This paper examines the relationship and provides some recommendations on the process of ensuring good recruitments into our party politics spectrum. A. INTRODUCTION Perhaps the only vocation in Nigeria today where the free entry and free exit principle of a perfect market system is operational is the vocation of party politics as people from all known professional backgrounds have found it a treasure ground of resort. It is in fact needless to ask an average politician where he or she got training in party politics. Regrettably, political recruitment process in Nigeria is very simple and without any major technical requirements, people can enroll at any point in time into party politics. The only requirement, if anything else, is your availability the amount of readiness demonstrated by the aspiring individual to attend party meetings and caucuses. Just write down your name and attend one or two political party meetings and you are on your way to becoming a big time politician in Nigeria. This is the point where we come to explain the prevalence of political neophytes at the various levels of public policy making in Nigeria as all manner of people both with questionable and unquestionable backgrounds in the management of public resources find themselves in the realm of leadership simply because of a faulty recruitment process into the vocation of party politics in Nigeria. Thus, you find medical doctors, teachers, motor drivers, auto mechanics, pastors or other religious leaders, retail shop owners and jobless individuals all involved in party politics as practitioners of a profession that relies much on number of people as its major asset. â€Å"Leave politics for the politicians† is often the advice given by those who do not find any need to become one. Yet there is hardly a clear definition of who is or (should be) a politician in Nigeria since it has become an all-corners affair. With such a seemingly irreversible phenomenon of political recruitment, the chal1eng to policymakers therefore is to create entrepreneurship educational portfolios where recruits into party politics in Nigeria would develop skills of the, vocation to take opportunities offered by the prevailing political (business) environments. B. ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION: A CONCEPTUAL CLARIFICATION Experts in the subject matter of history of education have credited ancient Greek civilization with its emphasis placed not only on citizenship but also on entrepreneurship education. With massive curricular contents favouring the child’s ability to use available materials through practical skills to create innovative learning outcomes, an average Athenian schoolboy knows that he has to imbibe a strong culture of entrepreneurship education. Entrepreneurship education seeks to provide students with the knowledge, skills and motivation to encourage entrepreneurial success in a variety of settings. (Block Stumpf, 1992) The classic picture of entrepreneurship education (also known as intrapreneurship education) as given by its major proponent Gifford Pinchot, is its distinctive focus on the â€Å"realization of opportunity† under any given setting (Pinchot, 1985). The ability of the individual to see the opportunity and utilize it for a successful outcome marks the significance of entrepreneurship education (Pinchot Pellman, 1985). Although closely related to management education which focuses on the best way to operate within existing hierarchy and structures, entrepreneurship education like the former targets â€Å"profit making†. Profit making, in this circumstance does not necessarily imply increased monetary benefits, but may also be (especially in non-profit organizations or governments) in terms of en hanced social services or decreased costs. It could also be explained in terms of increased responsiveness to the customer/citizen/client on such services being provided. Realizing business opportunity can be achieved, by orienting entrepreneurship education towards several directions including; Entrepreneurship (the ownership) of a new business, such as opening a new shop or small scale industry; interpreneurship (which involves the promotion of innovation or the introduction of new products or services or markets within existing environments or organization without having to start a separate (new) business unit (Pinchot, 2000). This may be made possible through research and innovative initiative among entrepreneurs. Consider for example, a food vendor who sells within a given business environment and suddenly discovers that the target clientele is expanding due to some expansionary activities of the neighboring companies resulting in their employment of new staffers. Intrapreneurship requires that the food vendor can no longer operate within his existing budget if he is to maximize profits. He does not need to be educated on the desirability of budg etary expansion to enable him create an absolute capacity for his new client’s demand. A third orientation relates to what experts call social entrepreneur which involves creating charitable organizations (or portions of existing charities) designed to be self-supporting in addition to doing their good works. Intrapreneurship may lead to a phenomenon described as clustering. Clustering occurs when a group of employers breaks from a parent company to form a new company but continues to do business with the parent organization as in the popular Silicon Valley clusters. This phenomenon is common among lawyers who while working under existing legal chambers do break out often to undertake some business ventures without having to quit their existing chambers entirely. Pinchot believes that entrepreneurship releases the energy’ in the direction of deep personal values while also it is a tool for releasing the creativity, values and entrepreneurial spirit of people who work in large corporations. â€Å"When you free people from fear and bureaucratic restraint, they are likely to choose innovation projects that serve their deeper values (Pinchot 1985) Intrapreneurs have a great zeal to be innovative and a drive to ownership. The entrepreneurial sence of independence is so high among intrapreneurs that Pinchot in his ten commandments of Intrapreneuring describes their attitude in work organizations as people who â€Å"come to work daily willing to be fired†. For a productive and profit-oriented business success, intrapreneurship education is very useful. What relevance therefore, can there be, of entrepreneurship education to political recruitment in the Nigerian policy and how may we define the line of congruence between these variables. C. ASSESSING THE RELEVANCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION TO POLITICAL RECRUITMENT IN NIGERIA Porter (1994) has established a relationship between entrepreneurship education and business education. We can extend this discourse by establishing some relationship between entrepreneurship education and political recruitment in Nigeria. Political recruitment is a process by which citizens are selected for involvement in politics. Party system is the most important mechanism of political recruitment, The process of political recruitment involves two levels namely: recruitment of power elite, that is, party and government cadres and the recruitment of grassroots membership who provide political support for party programmes and policies. The recruitment of grassroots may involve a historical process whereby certain cadres of the society are targeted for recruitment e.g. peasant workers and revolutionary youths, and this is then followed by the recruitment of workers, students and rebellion youths and then the recruitment of professional and educated youths. The recruitment provides a stage of political screening such as the examination of class origin, political attitude, political participation or clientelism. Clientelism in the view of Protsyk Matichescu (2009) involves contingent direct exchanges between political actors and both vote-rich and resource-rich constituencies. At the initial point, the role of educational credentials in political recruitment may be irrelevant, but with time, become positive or negative and finally very important. The relevance of entrepreneurship education to political recruitment in Nigeria can be established in several ways. Firstly, entrepreneurship education provides the individual with the strong initiative to succeed in his political career. There is a strong imperative to see party politics as not merely a game being played by two or more persons, but more importantly as a field where excellence in service is required. The individual will take ownership of his actions with a strong sense of judgment that being a politician can be onerous and requires a lot of responsibility and expectations from the society in terms of excellent service to the people. Entrepreneurship education can help promote the spirit of innovativeness among people who chose to enlist in party politics. The individual utilizes every new opportunity in his political environment to create new political images of success. For instance, a politician who observes that there is a growing school enrolment among children in his community and or neighbouring communities would devise new creative political slogans or even manifestoes that will appeal to the immediate passions of his proposed electorate. It is needless for an aspiring politician targeting upland dwellers to propose programmes designed or suitable for riverine areas such as riverine transport system. Entrepreneurship education would facilitate political education especially in rural or unenlightened communities as individual aspirant would localize training techniques or apply local technologies to provide the relevant learning materials to his subjects. This will also help in reducing costs to the ultimate advantage of the subsisting party to which the individual belongs. Entrepreneurship education should be a suitable tool for sensitizing the right type of party membership at all cadres or recruitment. Subjects should therefore choose to belong to a political party with a genuine sense of awareness about his expectations not merely joining a band wagon. Subjects should have their energy released towards a vocation where their deep personnel values reside. The present phenomenon where party politics is seen as a residue to retire to where all other endeavours have failed or a place where quick wealth and fame can be realized can no longer prevail. D. Conclusion and Recommendations An entrepreneur is an owner of a business. Entrepreneurs are driven by the myths of greed, high risk taking, intuitive thinking and even sometimes dishonesty ( Pinchot, 2000) The business may be tangible for it to be observed by others. However, the sense of entrepreneurship may be presently dialectical and reside within the individual who only waits for any physical opportunity to realize his ownership dream. Entrepreneurship education should be a relevant tool to facilitate the ownership drives among people in various vocations including party politics. In particular reference to political recruitment entrepreneurship education should help stimulate the right type of practitioners and hence secure the right quality of leaders needed especially for a developing polity like Nigeria. Existing educational programmes should be philosophically tailored to meet the needs of subjects who are the future entrepreneurs in Nigeria. This would lead to the redirection of subjects’ perception of schooling as not merely a means of securing paid jobs. In a society with dwindling employment options, entrepreneurship education should be a suitable tool for fostering the self-employment initiatives among the school leaving class and those enlisting in other entrepreneurial vocations. The strong Connections between entrepreneurship education and good governance in Nigeria can therefore no longer be imaginary under this discourse but realistic. REFERENCES Block, Z. Stumpf, S. A. (1992) Entrepreneurship education research: Experience and challenge. In D. L. Sexton and J. D. Kasarda, (Eds.) The state of the art of entrepreneurship, Boston, MA: PWS-Kent Publishing, pp. 17-45. Protsyk, O. Matichescu, M.L. (2009) Clientelism and political recruitment in democratic transition. Evidence from Romania, retrieved from the net onO4/ 22/2011 @http://www.policy.hu/protsyk /Publications/Articles/CPRomClient 11 .pdf. Pinchot, III G. (1985). Intrapreneuring; Why you do not have to leave the organization. New York, NY:,-. Harper Row. Pinchot, G. Pellman, R. (2000) Intrapreneurship in action: A handbook for business innovation, San-Francisco, California : Berrett-Kohler. Porter, L. W. (1994). The relation of entrepreneurship education to business education. Simulation gaming 25(3): 416-419.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

The Son Of God Religion Essay

The Son Of God Religion Essay In the gospel of Mark we read of the Son of God, but this title is used sparingly, only at key moments The Transfiguration, Trial with the High Priest when Christ is condemned and by the centurion at the foot of the Cross, truly this Man was the Son of God. Mark wants people to know the Christ is the Son of God, he does not want people to misunderstand who Jesus is, he is not a magician, healer, etc. There is a lot to more to Jesus and Mark wrote his gospel to clear up the misunderstandings that had arisen with regard to Jesus. The gospel writers knew they were right, they did not want people to lose heart; the communities that they were writing for were communities of faith. Mark says Jesus is Divine; He is the Son of God, not some local hero. He is the Son of God faithful to his Father. We hear Peters answer to the question asked by Jesus is correct. Peter calls Jesus the Christ but he really does not understand what he has said, he did not really understand what this meant. This is the turning point in Marks gospel. Peter thought that Jesus was power and glory. He saw Jesus as a great person with great power greater than that of Caesar and King David rolled into one. Jesus was swift to correct Peter who had made a mistake. To be Christ meant rejection, torture, death and then and only then Resurrection, but to a new kind of life, eternal life offered to all. . Peter had to accept Christs idea of what it meant to be Christ and to totally accept this idea. Peter had to be converted. He had to realise that Christ had not come to overturn Caesar; Christ had come to destroy sin, death and the Devil. Are we like Peter and answer Jesus, you are the Christ without actually thinking what this means. There are consequences if we say Jesus, you are the Christ and these consequences are not defined by us, they are guided by Christ. If I genuinely believe in Christ I will surrender myself to His will, His ways, His agenda for me, I will not set my own agenda I will not care about my own comfort etc. I will visit Him in the Blessed Sacrament and see him in all the people I come across without exception. If I genuinely believe that Christ is the Son of God, then everything changes and it must change. The deeper I enter into a relationship with Christ and the more I embrace His ways, His ideals, etc the more committed I become. I become a Christian. We become totally converted. But I only become a true follower and committed member of the church if my faith is profound and rooted in Christ, so rooted that it is in the depths of my heart. So I must show concern for all not matter who they are. Faith as mentioned in the Letter of James is not only prayer but also means showing compassion and care for Gods people, as Christ has, if one of the brothers or one of the sisters is in need and we do not help then our faith is only a talking faith. Faith in Christ is a faith of action. A faith without deeds is an abstract faith if the good works do not go with faith, it is quite dead Faith in unity with Christ, does what Christ would do. No point in being pious, kneeling in front of the Blessed Sacrament and being totally unaware of what is going on around us and saying to ourselves that what is happening in the third world countries has nothing to do with me. So there are consequences in being a Christian and saying You are the Messiah, the Anointed One of God We must be prepared to deny ourselves to follow Christ and listen to what he has to say to us. We will never be asked to give up our life for Christ I hope, I mean to be martyred for our faith. But we are asked to lose our life, and this means that we enter into a loving relationship with Christ, we love Him without reservation, we take up our cross whatever that is follow Him without grumbling. We give ourselves wholeheartedly to Christ. This gospel today challenges us as followers of Christ. Can we willingly follow like the Suffering Servant mentioned in our Psalm, giving ourselves completely to God and to die for Christ like he died for us. IF WE DO THIS OUR LIVES WILL BE TRANSFRORMED BEYOND WORDS.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Portrayal of Jane Osborne in Vanity Fair Essay -- Victorian Era Willia

The Redundant Woman Thackeray’s portrayal of Jane Osborne in Vanity Fair is very troubling to the reader of the twentieth century. Grown to be a woman who is stuck under her tyrannical father’s roof, her life appears to be very confining and menial. Her sister snubs her, her nephew mocks her behind her back, her father mocks her to her face, and her main role in life seems to be as her father’s housekeeper. However, Thackeray’s portrayal would have had a very different effect on the Victorian reader. While all of these things which affronted us would have been equally awful to them, Thackeray uses another key phrase which has lost its effect on our modern minds: "that unfortunate and now middle-aged young lady" (448). Jane Osborne’s future has progressed from being uncertain, waiting somewhat impatiently for a suitor’s attentions, to a dreadful certainty; she is quickly becoming what the Victorians referred to as a â€Å"redundant woman.† Destiny A Victorian woman was bred up with the honored ideals of someday being â€Å"wives, daughters, and guardians of the home† (Parkinson). A model young woman was designed as a bargaining tool; her person, characteristics, skills, and, for those who were fortunate, dowry were key chips to be laid in a game of houses which defined the noblest aspirations of Victorian society. The very â€Å"spheres of influence† written about by so many authors of the time, both male and female, dictated that â€Å"what the woman is to be within her fates, as the centre of order, the balm of distress, and the mirror of beauty: that she is also to be without her fates, where order is more difficult, distress more imminent, loveliness more rare† (Ruskin). However, being bred for marriage produces a number of problems; hundre... ...n† has become very antiquated, and purposeless in a world where women have more and more opportunities for equal advancement, affirmative action, etc. It is interesting, however, to note that the ideas of â€Å"spheres of influence† still persist, though somewhat altered. Works Cited Greg, W. R. â€Å"Why Are Women Redundant?† (excerpt). Phoebe Junior. Elizabeth Langland. Broadview Literary Text. Toronto: Broadview Press Ltd., 2002. Pages 449-450. Ruskin, John. â€Å"Of Queen’s Gardens† (excerpt). Phoebe Junior. Elizabeth Langland. Broadview Literary Text. Toronto: Broadview Press Ltd., 2002. Pages 446-449. Parkinson, Allison. â€Å"Sphere Switching Polly, Work/Life Choices and the ‘redundant woman’ in 19th Century London.† November 9, 2004. Thackeray, William M. Vanity Fair. New York: Random House, Inc., 2001.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Setting in Tess of DUbervilles by Thomas Hardy :: essays research papers

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy, uses setting as a main source to establish meaning and atmosphere, and contribute to themes. The d'Urberville estate is a place of dishonor and deceit, whereas the Talbothays dairy farm is a place of hope and new beginnings. Tess's home is the false refuge from the disapproving society. The d'Urberville estate is perfectly described by the clichà © ?looks can be deceiving.? Although the mansion is beautiful, deception and trickery loom within. Alec d?Urberville deceives Tess and takes advantage of her naivety, proving the societal significance of ?Man over Woman.? His desire for Tess ultimately triumphs over her resistance to him, resulting in Tess?s tragic ruin. Moreover, it proves society?s double standard in viewing men and women. It is socially acceptable for d?Urberville to have affairs, but when Tess is seduced, she is considered unclean and an improper lady. In addition, it is at this estate that d?Urberville falsely discloses to Tess that she is not of d?Urberville blood because of her family?s poor industrial status and, therefore, not of a noble class. At Talbothays, Tess begins a new life. The atmosphere is fresh and the people are warm and friendly, deceit is undetectable. Tess and Angel Clare take many walks through the woods in the brisk morning air, and it is there that Clare teaches Tess intellectual knowledge as well as his rejection of Christianity. Gradually, the couple?s attraction for each other grows into true love and they are soon married, despite Clare?s parents? disapproval because Tess is a lowly dairymaid and not of an aristocratic class as they are. Tess is greatly attracted to Clare, as are three other dairymaids at the farm, Marian, Izz, and Retty. Their love for him controls their emotions and actions, such as Retty attempting suicide and Marian?s digression into alcoholism after Tess and Clare?s marriage. Tess?s home is her place of refuge, but it does not always function as a solitary place for her. She returns home after her stay at the d?Urberville estate, but is shunned by society because of her out-of-wedlock child. When she returns home once again from her stay at Talbothays, she is looked upon with suspicion because her husband, Clare, is absent. During each visit, Tess made an attempt to retreat from the harsh world, but she could never fully hide from society. Setting in Tess of D'Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy :: essays research papers Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy, uses setting as a main source to establish meaning and atmosphere, and contribute to themes. The d'Urberville estate is a place of dishonor and deceit, whereas the Talbothays dairy farm is a place of hope and new beginnings. Tess's home is the false refuge from the disapproving society. The d'Urberville estate is perfectly described by the clichà © ?looks can be deceiving.? Although the mansion is beautiful, deception and trickery loom within. Alec d?Urberville deceives Tess and takes advantage of her naivety, proving the societal significance of ?Man over Woman.? His desire for Tess ultimately triumphs over her resistance to him, resulting in Tess?s tragic ruin. Moreover, it proves society?s double standard in viewing men and women. It is socially acceptable for d?Urberville to have affairs, but when Tess is seduced, she is considered unclean and an improper lady. In addition, it is at this estate that d?Urberville falsely discloses to Tess that she is not of d?Urberville blood because of her family?s poor industrial status and, therefore, not of a noble class. At Talbothays, Tess begins a new life. The atmosphere is fresh and the people are warm and friendly, deceit is undetectable. Tess and Angel Clare take many walks through the woods in the brisk morning air, and it is there that Clare teaches Tess intellectual knowledge as well as his rejection of Christianity. Gradually, the couple?s attraction for each other grows into true love and they are soon married, despite Clare?s parents? disapproval because Tess is a lowly dairymaid and not of an aristocratic class as they are. Tess is greatly attracted to Clare, as are three other dairymaids at the farm, Marian, Izz, and Retty. Their love for him controls their emotions and actions, such as Retty attempting suicide and Marian?s digression into alcoholism after Tess and Clare?s marriage. Tess?s home is her place of refuge, but it does not always function as a solitary place for her. She returns home after her stay at the d?Urberville estate, but is shunned by society because of her out-of-wedlock child. When she returns home once again from her stay at Talbothays, she is looked upon with suspicion because her husband, Clare, is absent. During each visit, Tess made an attempt to retreat from the harsh world, but she could never fully hide from society.

Symbols in The Great Gatsby :: Free Essay Writer

Symbols in The Great Gatsby In the Great Gatsby, a lot of things can be looked at as symbols. The weather, Daisy’s dresses, the eyes of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg, and even the lights. By using symbols, Fitzgerald makes the story more deep, and enjoyable for some readers. Fitzgerald also uses various themes throughout his story of the Great Gatsby, like Gatsby’s â€Å"American dream.† The two most important symbols in the story are the green lights at the end of daisy’s dock, and the eyes of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg. The green lights represent Gatsby’s â€Å"American dream† and his yearning for daisy. The reader doesn’t understand this for a while though. Fitzgerald shows us later that this is what they stand for, to show how something simple can represent so much. The eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg is simply a sign that lingers over the valley of ashes. The reader can interpret it as anything he/she wishes. Toward the end of the novel, however, George Wilson interprets the eyes as the eyes of God, and he must act properly under them. Gatsby’s American dream is the theme throughout the story. He lives a life of luxury, throwing huge parties, and living in a mansion. Gatsby wanted this life since he was a kid. He also wants the girl of his dreams, Daisy, in his life, only he can’t have her because she is in love with Tom. Gatsby makes Daisy a symbol of everything he wants because of her beauty, wealth, and worry-less attitude. There are also small symbols and themes in the story as well. The color of daisy’s white dress, for example, sets the mood for the scene. And on the hottest day of the year is when Tom and Gatsby have their confrontation. Overall, the symbols and themes in this story seem to come together because of Gatsby’s dream for Daisy, which is the symbol of the green lights, who is everything Gatsby wants.